Summary

From squash, to sweet potatoes and carrots, these seasonal vegetables are packed full of vitamins and nutrients. Make sure you are incorporating a few of these amazing fall favorites into some of your meals this season!

As Summer comes to a close and the days grow shorter and cooler, we prepare ourselves for Fall. Windy, dry, and cool, we toss on our sweaters, sip spiced teas, and seek warmth by the fire or from our communities. This is the season of grains and root vegetables with flavorful digestion enhancing spices that will keep us warm and grounded while supporting our immunity. Luckily, from crisp pome fruit like apples and pears, sweet root vegetables, and sturdy winter squash, the cooler temperature provides an array of seasonal produce.

Not only does in-season produce taste better and more fresh, produce that has been naturally ripened and harvested at the right time will have much more flavor and nutritional value. Get excited about the approaching season as we highlight some of the amazing nutrient properties of everyday whole foods and the powerful contributions they can make to your health and wellbeing. 

Butternut squash is one of the most popular modern varieties of winter squash, and for good reason. Versatile in application and approachable in flavor, when cooked it becomes tender and offers a mild squash flavor with sweet and nutty notes. Including this low-calorie seasonal gourd into your diet will provide nutrients including vitamin A, vitamin C, magnesium, and potassium.

Thistle's beet and squash salad incorporates a few fall ingredients into one delicious meal! 

Acorn squash is native to the Americas and was one of the first crops cultivated by Native Americans. With a unique shape lined with tapered, deeply furrowed ridges, this squash is an excellent source of dietary fiber and contains vitamin C, vitamin B6, magnesium, manganese, and potassium. It’s packed with many beneficial plant compounds, including carotenoids and antioxidants, to promote overall health and wellness when incorporated into a meal.

Despite being available year-round, sweet potatoes are exceptionally abundant during autumn,  offering a delicious sugary-sweet flavor with earthy undertones.The antioxidants found in sweet potatoes that create a rich color are carotenoids that bolster damaged cell walls. Just one sweet potato can provide 400% of your daily requirement of vitamin A, which emboldens your immune system and your body’s defense against germs. There are so many ways to eat sweet potatoes, this recipe is one of our favorites. 

The phytonutrient-rich pear makes great, sweet additions to any meal and are delicious eaten on their own. As a great source of fiber, pears benefit blood sugar regulation as well as promoting healthy bowels, lowering LDL “bad” cholesterol, and aiding in healthy weight loss. A unique combination of two phytonutrient groups, flavonols and flavan-3-ols also improve blood sugar regulation by improving insulin sensitivity. Apples, the other pome fruit, have similar nutritional benefits with additional antioxidant properties from vitamin C, quercetin, flavonoids and polyphenols.

Dense and crisp, carrots are found with a wide variety of colors ranging from shades of orange, yellow, purple, black, red, to white. There are two antioxidants responsible for giving carrots their bright colors - carotenoids for orange and yellow colors and anthocyanins for red and purple colors. Rich in potassium, carrots are helpful in keeping blood pressure stable while the fiber aids digestion. The vitamin C in carrots helps build antibodies that defend your immune system while calcium and vitamin K improve bone growth.

Kabocha squash, also known as the Japanese pumpkin, is not only popular in Japan and Korea, but is also used in the Caribbean and in other cuisines of the world, though it’s referred to by different names. Similar to butternut squash, its rich orange color indicates an excellent source of beta carotene. Kabocha squash provides vitamins A and C, some B vitamins, calcium, iron, and fiber. Sweeter and more buttery than the other winter gourds, this squash has a flavor profile reminiscent of sweet potato and pumpkin. 

The seasonal favorite, pumpkin squash when cooked is tender and offers a mild taste with sweet and nutty flavors. Deeply lobed with prominent ribbing, the smooth rind encases bright orange flesh. This vibrantly orange gourd is rich in vitamins A, E, and C, potassium, fiber, iron, and carotenoids like beta-carotene and lutein, which help protect cells against damage by free radicals. Its supply of vitamin E, iron and folate strengthen immunity as well and are critical for motor and cognitive development. No wonder pumpkin pie is a holiday staple!

Beets have various vitamins as well as immune boosting components!

Sweet and earthy with vibrant colors, beets are one of the most potent sources of lycopene, a powerful antioxidant that protects the body from free radicals. This root vegetable is an excellent source of vitamin C and vitamin A, which combination creates a great antioxidant capacity while delivering a unique flavor and beautiful pigmentation to any recipe. Beets are also a good source of folate and betaine that help decrease homocysteine levels in the blood preventing arterial damage and blood clots in your blood vessels.

What Nutrients Do Red and Orange Vegetables Contain?

One of the most important minerals in the body, potassium is necessary for the normal functioning of all cells. Potassium is also vital for synthesizing protein and metabolizing carbohydrates, as well as helping regulate fluid balance and ensuring proper function of the muscles and nerves. Ensuring your diet includes sufficient sources of potassium may help keep blood pressure in a healthy range while being associated with a lower risk of stroke.

Vitamin A, also known as retinol, has several important functions. It strengthens the immune system and helps fight infections while also supporting cell growth, eye health, bone health, and immune function. This fat-soluble vitamin is critical to so many bodily functions as it moves through the body scavenging damaging free radicals and fighting inflammation. It protects against UV damage and slows signs of aging by encouraging healthy skin cell production. Consume vitamin A by including good whole plant sources of beta-carotene in your diet, as the body can convert this into retinol. 

Vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid, is involved in many body functions. Bioflavonoids, present in all natural sources of vitamin C, improve the action of vitamin C. Foods rich in vitamin C can enhance the quality and healing of connective tissue while improving absorption of other nutrients. A diet with an adequate amount of vitamin C aids the body in maintaining healthy skin, blood vessels, bones and cartilage while also helping take in and use iron and prevent infections. 

Vitamin K is a group of vitamins needed to make various proteins like prothrombin responsible for blood clotting. This protein helps turn blood from a liquid consistency before hardening into a scab helping wounds heal. Osteocalcin is another protein that requires vitamin K to produce healthy bone tissue providing a protective health benefit for longevity. A crucial role in this cell turnover process, vitamin K promotes the cycle of cell growth and replacement that maintains bone strength and keeps them resistant to breaking. Dark leafy green vegetables also contain a high amount of vitamin K which is why we include kale, collard greens, broccoli, spinach, cabbage, and many varieties of lettuce in all of our meals.

What Are The Health Benefits?

Antioxidants help your immunity militia fight off harmful free radicals lowering your risk of cancer. Free radicals are produced through metabolic processes with the useful role of destroying harmful bacteria, despite being highly unstable. Excessive free radicals create a state called oxidative stress, which is linked to many chronic illnesses, such as cancer and heart disease. Natural compounds like anthocyanin and antioxidants, such as alpha-carotene, beta-carotene and beta-cryptoxanthin, neutralize free radicals, stopping them from damaging your cells.

It is common for eyesight to diminish with age, however a diet with the right nutrients can lower the risk of sight loss. Lycopene, lutein, and beta-carotene are powerful antioxidants that protect the eyes against light induced damage, the development of cataracts, and age-related macular degeneration. Beta-carotene also provides necessary vitamin A, which when deficient is a very common cause of blindness. Vitamin A, also known as retinol, is essential to the formation of visual purple in the retina, which allows vision in dim light.

The first-line treatment to high blood pressure is lifestyle modification. Decreasing and maintaining a low sodium intake combined with an increase of potassium, are important dietary changes to maintain healthful blood pressure as well as reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. 

The best foods for healthy teeth and overall oral hygiene are fresh produce because of their nutritional and mouth health benefits. For example, crisp carrots and other fibrous, hard vegetables help clean plaque from teeth, stimulate the gums and help to generate mouth-cleansing saliva. Produce containing antioxidant vitamins, such as vitamin C, helps protect gums and other tissues from cell damage and bacterial infection. Leafy salad greens contain lots of folic acid, a member of the B vitamin family, which promotes a healthy mouth and supports cell growth throughout the entire body. Beta carotene, which is abundant this season, is needed to create vitamin A, a nutrient essential for building strong teeth.

How To Include Red And Orange Vegetables In Your Diet? 

The food choices we make every day are the most important choices we can make regarding our health and longevity. Just as our bodies are more than nutrient-processing systems, foods are not merely collections of nutrients. It’s never too late to begin embracing foods that heal, nourish, energize, and give us life. Whole, unprocessed plant foods naturally contain the macro and micronutrients we need to ensure the maximum benefit nature intended.

Get meals delivered to your door
We believe eating delicious is crucial to a healthy diet. Each week, our team of chefs design a new menu for what's in season, fresh and flavorful.
TRY THISTLE
Posted 
Oct 14, 2020
 in 
Nutrition
 category.
Summary

From squash, to sweet potatoes and carrots, these seasonal vegetables are packed full of vitamins and nutrients. Make sure you are incorporating a few of these amazing fall favorites into some of your meals this season!

As Summer comes to a close and the days grow shorter and cooler, we prepare ourselves for Fall. Windy, dry, and cool, we toss on our sweaters, sip spiced teas, and seek warmth by the fire or from our communities. This is the season of grains and root vegetables with flavorful digestion enhancing spices that will keep us warm and grounded while supporting our immunity. Luckily, from crisp pome fruit like apples and pears, sweet root vegetables, and sturdy winter squash, the cooler temperature provides an array of seasonal produce.

Not only does in-season produce taste better and more fresh, produce that has been naturally ripened and harvested at the right time will have much more flavor and nutritional value. Get excited about the approaching season as we highlight some of the amazing nutrient properties of everyday whole foods and the powerful contributions they can make to your health and wellbeing. 

Butternut squash is one of the most popular modern varieties of winter squash, and for good reason. Versatile in application and approachable in flavor, when cooked it becomes tender and offers a mild squash flavor with sweet and nutty notes. Including this low-calorie seasonal gourd into your diet will provide nutrients including vitamin A, vitamin C, magnesium, and potassium.

Thistle's beet and squash salad incorporates a few fall ingredients into one delicious meal! 

Acorn squash is native to the Americas and was one of the first crops cultivated by Native Americans. With a unique shape lined with tapered, deeply furrowed ridges, this squash is an excellent source of dietary fiber and contains vitamin C, vitamin B6, magnesium, manganese, and potassium. It’s packed with many beneficial plant compounds, including carotenoids and antioxidants, to promote overall health and wellness when incorporated into a meal.

Despite being available year-round, sweet potatoes are exceptionally abundant during autumn,  offering a delicious sugary-sweet flavor with earthy undertones.The antioxidants found in sweet potatoes that create a rich color are carotenoids that bolster damaged cell walls. Just one sweet potato can provide 400% of your daily requirement of vitamin A, which emboldens your immune system and your body’s defense against germs. There are so many ways to eat sweet potatoes, this recipe is one of our favorites. 

The phytonutrient-rich pear makes great, sweet additions to any meal and are delicious eaten on their own. As a great source of fiber, pears benefit blood sugar regulation as well as promoting healthy bowels, lowering LDL “bad” cholesterol, and aiding in healthy weight loss. A unique combination of two phytonutrient groups, flavonols and flavan-3-ols also improve blood sugar regulation by improving insulin sensitivity. Apples, the other pome fruit, have similar nutritional benefits with additional antioxidant properties from vitamin C, quercetin, flavonoids and polyphenols.

Dense and crisp, carrots are found with a wide variety of colors ranging from shades of orange, yellow, purple, black, red, to white. There are two antioxidants responsible for giving carrots their bright colors - carotenoids for orange and yellow colors and anthocyanins for red and purple colors. Rich in potassium, carrots are helpful in keeping blood pressure stable while the fiber aids digestion. The vitamin C in carrots helps build antibodies that defend your immune system while calcium and vitamin K improve bone growth.

Kabocha squash, also known as the Japanese pumpkin, is not only popular in Japan and Korea, but is also used in the Caribbean and in other cuisines of the world, though it’s referred to by different names. Similar to butternut squash, its rich orange color indicates an excellent source of beta carotene. Kabocha squash provides vitamins A and C, some B vitamins, calcium, iron, and fiber. Sweeter and more buttery than the other winter gourds, this squash has a flavor profile reminiscent of sweet potato and pumpkin. 

The seasonal favorite, pumpkin squash when cooked is tender and offers a mild taste with sweet and nutty flavors. Deeply lobed with prominent ribbing, the smooth rind encases bright orange flesh. This vibrantly orange gourd is rich in vitamins A, E, and C, potassium, fiber, iron, and carotenoids like beta-carotene and lutein, which help protect cells against damage by free radicals. Its supply of vitamin E, iron and folate strengthen immunity as well and are critical for motor and cognitive development. No wonder pumpkin pie is a holiday staple!

Beets have various vitamins as well as immune boosting components!

Sweet and earthy with vibrant colors, beets are one of the most potent sources of lycopene, a powerful antioxidant that protects the body from free radicals. This root vegetable is an excellent source of vitamin C and vitamin A, which combination creates a great antioxidant capacity while delivering a unique flavor and beautiful pigmentation to any recipe. Beets are also a good source of folate and betaine that help decrease homocysteine levels in the blood preventing arterial damage and blood clots in your blood vessels.

What Nutrients Do Red and Orange Vegetables Contain?

One of the most important minerals in the body, potassium is necessary for the normal functioning of all cells. Potassium is also vital for synthesizing protein and metabolizing carbohydrates, as well as helping regulate fluid balance and ensuring proper function of the muscles and nerves. Ensuring your diet includes sufficient sources of potassium may help keep blood pressure in a healthy range while being associated with a lower risk of stroke.

Vitamin A, also known as retinol, has several important functions. It strengthens the immune system and helps fight infections while also supporting cell growth, eye health, bone health, and immune function. This fat-soluble vitamin is critical to so many bodily functions as it moves through the body scavenging damaging free radicals and fighting inflammation. It protects against UV damage and slows signs of aging by encouraging healthy skin cell production. Consume vitamin A by including good whole plant sources of beta-carotene in your diet, as the body can convert this into retinol. 

Vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid, is involved in many body functions. Bioflavonoids, present in all natural sources of vitamin C, improve the action of vitamin C. Foods rich in vitamin C can enhance the quality and healing of connective tissue while improving absorption of other nutrients. A diet with an adequate amount of vitamin C aids the body in maintaining healthy skin, blood vessels, bones and cartilage while also helping take in and use iron and prevent infections. 

Vitamin K is a group of vitamins needed to make various proteins like prothrombin responsible for blood clotting. This protein helps turn blood from a liquid consistency before hardening into a scab helping wounds heal. Osteocalcin is another protein that requires vitamin K to produce healthy bone tissue providing a protective health benefit for longevity. A crucial role in this cell turnover process, vitamin K promotes the cycle of cell growth and replacement that maintains bone strength and keeps them resistant to breaking. Dark leafy green vegetables also contain a high amount of vitamin K which is why we include kale, collard greens, broccoli, spinach, cabbage, and many varieties of lettuce in all of our meals.

What Are The Health Benefits?

Antioxidants help your immunity militia fight off harmful free radicals lowering your risk of cancer. Free radicals are produced through metabolic processes with the useful role of destroying harmful bacteria, despite being highly unstable. Excessive free radicals create a state called oxidative stress, which is linked to many chronic illnesses, such as cancer and heart disease. Natural compounds like anthocyanin and antioxidants, such as alpha-carotene, beta-carotene and beta-cryptoxanthin, neutralize free radicals, stopping them from damaging your cells.

It is common for eyesight to diminish with age, however a diet with the right nutrients can lower the risk of sight loss. Lycopene, lutein, and beta-carotene are powerful antioxidants that protect the eyes against light induced damage, the development of cataracts, and age-related macular degeneration. Beta-carotene also provides necessary vitamin A, which when deficient is a very common cause of blindness. Vitamin A, also known as retinol, is essential to the formation of visual purple in the retina, which allows vision in dim light.

The first-line treatment to high blood pressure is lifestyle modification. Decreasing and maintaining a low sodium intake combined with an increase of potassium, are important dietary changes to maintain healthful blood pressure as well as reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. 

The best foods for healthy teeth and overall oral hygiene are fresh produce because of their nutritional and mouth health benefits. For example, crisp carrots and other fibrous, hard vegetables help clean plaque from teeth, stimulate the gums and help to generate mouth-cleansing saliva. Produce containing antioxidant vitamins, such as vitamin C, helps protect gums and other tissues from cell damage and bacterial infection. Leafy salad greens contain lots of folic acid, a member of the B vitamin family, which promotes a healthy mouth and supports cell growth throughout the entire body. Beta carotene, which is abundant this season, is needed to create vitamin A, a nutrient essential for building strong teeth.

How To Include Red And Orange Vegetables In Your Diet? 

The food choices we make every day are the most important choices we can make regarding our health and longevity. Just as our bodies are more than nutrient-processing systems, foods are not merely collections of nutrients. It’s never too late to begin embracing foods that heal, nourish, energize, and give us life. Whole, unprocessed plant foods naturally contain the macro and micronutrients we need to ensure the maximum benefit nature intended.

Get meals delivered to your door
We believe eating delicious is crucial to a healthy diet. Each week, our team of chefs design a new menu for what's in season, fresh and flavorful.
TRY THISTLE
Posted 
Oct 14, 2020
 in 
Nutrition
 category.